Consultation and engagement

Last updated - 1 February 2018

Resident consultation – summary report

Why we consulted

We wanted to ensure that current residents with both Notting Hill Housing (NHH) and Genesis Housing Association were informed about our plans to merge and able to express their views. This is best practice in line with the revised Homes and Communities Agency tenant involvement and empowerment standard, which was issued on 14 July 2017.

Who we consulted

Over the course of the consultation, which ran from mid July to early December 2017, we wrote to all residents from both organisations and worked closely with representative groups including involved residents, local scrutiny panels, estate monitors and co-operatives.

How we consulted

We provided a range of mechanisms to help people find out more and contribute their views. These varied slightly between the two organisations, and included:

  • Letters to all residents, including shared owners, those in temporary accommodation, leaseholders, general needs tenants and people living in supported and extra care schemes
  • Information and feedback forms on our websites
  • Emails to involved residents and other groups representing residents
  • Telephone research
  • Estate walk-abouts
  • Q&A events
  • Drop-in sessions
  • Phone lines for those unable to access email or online resources

In addition to the letters, which went to all residents, we engaged with more than 3,000 residents between us through these activities.

The majority of our residents did not respond to the consultation, which could be inferred as indifference, but cannot be assumed.

What we found out

The majority of residents who responded did not express strong views either for or against the merger itself, but four main themes emerged, which need to be taken into account as we create our proposed new organisation:

  • We need to build trust with residents by doing what we say we will on issues such as repairs. That means that our communications need to be easier, quicker and more transparent, and we must ensure meaningful involvement for customers.
  • Getting bigger is fine, but we need to retain a local focus and a personal approach at the same time as ensuring that our social purpose is at the heart of everything we do.
  • We can increase satisfaction by focusing on our service style, repairs and sorting things out quicker.
  • Better value for money through getting things right first time, making the most of new technologies, providing fewer touch points before residents get an answer, and ensuring accurate and fair service charges.

Many respondents also wanted reassurance that rents and service charges would not go up as a result of the merger. Other topics included security of tenure, why we want to merge at all and the suitability of one another as partners.

Two organisations - Genesis residents and ListenNHH! - actively oppose the merger. Their concerns relate largely to the selling of social housing, rent increases and the commercialisation of housing associations. They have held a series of protests and maintained an ongoing letter-writing campaign, requesting factual information and statistics. We have responded to all of these letters and had conversations with members of both groups.

Resident promise

The consultation identified several main themes that residents consistently told us were important and that we need to address as a larger organisation. Specifically, we should:

  • Improve our repairs and maintenance service
  • Make better use of digital platforms and new technology to develop our services
  • Provide residents with more chances to move home if they want to
  • Create genuine resident involvement opportunities
  • Maintain a personalised service for those who want and need one
  • Provide greater training and employment opportunities
  • Ensure value for money and transparency around service charges

We subsequently held two events, which attracted about 50 residents, who provided rich feedback on each of these themes. They also had an opportunity to discuss anything else they felt was important at these events.

In addition, we have been engaging with our shareholders, who are residents, former staff, current and former board members and interested people from our local communities. Some have been involved with NHH and Genesis since we were founded in the 1960s. Their feedback largely reflects what we’ve heard from residents. They want us to:

  • Continue to provide genuinely affordable social homes in our heartlands
  • Improve our services
  • Maintain a local focus
  • Give residents a voice in our new organisation

In response, we have agreed that we will:

  • Preserve and invest in our legacy stock
  • Seek opportunities to provide new homes in the areas where we have our roots
  • Not sell off central London homes other than in exceptional circumstances
  • Introduce a local contact for each resident and a guaranteed annual visit
  • Use NHH’s expertise to create a financially strong organisation
  • Improve accountability through local resident involvement as well as by having two residents on our board
  • Finalise our resident promise and introduce a commitment to ensure that we are accountable to it

This shareholder feedback will be collated into our draft resident promise, which sets out our commitment to the services residents can expect post-merger. The promise reflects what our proposed new organisation will stand for and how we will be held to account by our residents. It is made up of three elements:

  • Our pledge about what our proposed new organisation will stand for
  • The improvements we will make to our existing services
  • The new services we are committed to developing with residents

We also need to do more work establish how the promise will work in practice as we build our new organisation.

Tell us what you think

The formal consultation process has now ended, but we’re always happy to hear from our residents so please continue to let us know what you think about the merger, or if you have any questions.

You can do this in several ways: